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Reboot

I know that a lot of my posts can come off as angry, depressing, and negative, and they to extent should. No one should have to go through what I have had to go through, and as a transgender lesbian who identifies as otherkin my communities deserves so much better. That being said I feel like my life has really gotten back on track. The summer break has helped me realize that though there are many things that won’t change right away and that I cannot change that I am doing my best and that I should enjoy life rather then being everywhere at once, and in a constant state of anger and sadness. I have a lovely new girlfriend and have planned out a plan of attack for next year and surgery. I’m sorry for not having posted for such a long time, but I am finally at the point where I have the time and energy to really post again. I love everyone who has been their for me and together we can change the world for the better.

radicalteen:

dapper-punk:

Darker Than Black 

REPRESENTATION IS IMPORTANT

(Source: 2dtransgirlcaptions)

May 8

Dear TERF’s part 2

You support the oppression of a group of women due to a un-natural fear and hatred of transgender individuals and their bodies. What you often list as gender is merely gender expression, which totally denies gender identities existence and is only a small part of gender. Your groups and many others of your ilk are also trying to create a conformist body policing culture not interested in the advancement of women, but interested in the advancement of the self at the expense of others, including transgender women and women of colour who are the least supported within the transgender community.

A huge part of the oppression you keep talking as though I am unaware of it, includes my transgender sisters, people who you and your cronies have callously abandon on the street and have no interest in helping. These are people who have no support, been thrown out of the their families, who are raped, and often must take up sex work to survive. To claim they are not just as entitled to the same human rights, opportunities and protections as yourself is selfish and cowardly. You dance around these points and laugh at the suffering of others when it is suggested that they deserve the same opportunities as other women, I truly pity you and your inability to see transgender women as women.

A late night thought about activism

The greatest heroes of the transgender community (and any community for that matter) are not the celebrities nor even the major community voices, but those within our community that stand up and fight everyday against privilege and hate, will not relent until equity is achieved for all peoples who need it and till we are recognized as human beings and treated as such. We are a community because we are all a team and we can all make a difference in this world. I will not be the one to alone change the world, nor can anyone person do so or expect others to change the world for them. What makes those who are well known powerful is the presence of their voice and ability to reach and move others.

We all make a a difference in some small way, and influence others to do the same. You do not need to be famous or even out on the front lines to make a difference and make change happen. There are so many ways to better the world, and it can be as simple as sharing your experiences and story with another and opening there eyes to who you are as a person. Every person has different means and skills that they can use, and different needs, weaknesses and lives to live. What should be important with activism is not how much time or money you can put in, nor the personal sacrifice or specific issue being tackled so much as it is the coming together and the supporting of those within our community who need it and advocates who help to express that need.

GLAAD you have disapointed me

This post should be entitled “GLAAD values money more then equity, and is willing to sell the transgender community out for gay advertising profits.” I participated in the talks between GLAAD’s media president Rich Ferraro and transgender activists such as Ashely Love about this issue. He and GLAAD should and does know better then this from that dialogue where apparently he completely ignored us. This is plain and simple a cop out, the type of cop out that clearly shows a lack of commitment to transgender issues or the transgender community. Why is it that when Duck dynasty and other shows display homophobic behavior GLAAD stands up to them immediately, where as GLAAD seemingly is doing nothing concrete within a issue that they have major control over (they actively advertise RuPaul’s show) and can take direct action in? This response feels cookie cutter and phony to me, and has no real evidence that any sort of change will occur.

GLAAD is eager to fight them tooth and nail when gay and lesbian rights are attacked, so why is it that the transgender community is expected to just be happy with “a dialogue”? What is there to talk about? Ru Paul has used incredibly offensive transphobic slurs repeatedly and is only getting a slap (or a pat more likely) on the wrist. Why is it that we in the transgender community are expected to continually be patient and have a dialogue about why transphobia is bad when, while Ru Paul and transphobic individuals within our community have repeatedly shown that they refuses to listen or care about the transgender community? Why is it that people pretend that community spaces are equitable when they so clearly aren’t and do nothing while people suffer? How can we hold others responsible for their actions when we can’t even hold our own community responsible and live up to what we claim our goals are (GLAAD mission statement clearly states that one of GLAAD’s goals is “Holding the media accountable for the words and images they present.”)?

My letter to GLAAD

an1mag1qu3:

namihatfield:

an1mag1qu3:

namihatfield:

We in the transgender community are alarmed by the fact that GLAAD a organization dedicated to LGBTQ rights continues to sponsor and advertise RuPaul’s drag show. RuPaul is responsible for use of derogatory transphobic language such as “She-male” and “Tranny” repeatedly within…

Oh lord… it was a joke. This is why no one likes trannies. You’re too damn sensitive. 

^^^Said by a drag queen who is cisgender and privileged, and who is willing to be complicit with transphobic behavior and language if it is used drag queens who have no business using such language. Do you have any idea what it is like to be transgender woman, and to fight each and every day against the sort of gross transphobic stereotypes that people like you have promoted (such telling transgender women that they are "too damn sensitive," or referring to me and others in my community as “Tr******,”)? We need to create communities and the world we want to live in, for me this not a community or world where it is acceptable to be co-opting hate speech aimed at other identities, where other communities speak for others, or where transphobia, erasure of transgender identity, nor misogyny is acceptable.

Anyone who uses the word Cis is elitist scum.  You’re a nasty selfish person. You don’t want equal rights, you want to be treated special and everyone can see through your bullshit. Have a nice day.

You sound like many conservative voters and politicians I have talked to doing activist work or heard in the news who claim that LGBTQ rights are “Special rights,” or that LGBTQ people want “to be treated special.” These same people have no problem silencing and stripping the basic human rights away from people like you and I, perhaps you should think twice before aligning with them or repeating their words.

I have no interest in talking with someone like you who doesn’t address my arguments and instead resorts to name calling, blindly follows Gay INC culture complicit with transphobia and privilege without taking any sort of responsibility, and is more then willing to throw the transgender community under the bus. Please don’t tell me to have a nice day when we both know that you don’t mean it, and only wish to silence my voice and the voice my siblings and don’t wish to hear what I have say or for women like me to speak out against oppression or have equity.

P.S. -Cisgender was a term created by cisgender individuals as a gender identity label much like Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Straight. The T-word you used on the other hand is a hate slur used against transgender individuals by transphobes. There is nothing elitist or offensive about the term cisgender, where as the terms you are using for me are highly offensive and you have no right to use the T-word. I’d rather be accused of being a elitist though then someone who bears pride in name calling and ignorance.

My letter to GLAAD

an1mag1qu3:

namihatfield:

We in the transgender community are alarmed by the fact that GLAAD a organization dedicated to LGBTQ rights continues to sponsor and advertise RuPaul’s drag show. RuPaul is responsible for use of derogatory transphobic language such as “She-male” and “Tranny” repeatedly within…

Oh lord… it was a joke. This is why no one likes trannies. You’re too damn sensitive. 

^^^Said by a drag queen who is cisgender and privileged, and who is willing to be complicit with transphobic behavior and language if it is used drag queens who have no business using such language. Do you have any idea what it is like to be transgender woman, and to fight each and every day against the sort of gross transphobic stereotypes that people like you have promoted (such telling transgender women that they are "too damn sensitive," or referring to me and others in my community as “Tr******,”)? We need to create communities and the world we want to live in, for me this not a community or world where it is acceptable to be co-opting hate speech aimed at other identities, where other communities speak for others, or where transphobia, erasure of transgender identity, nor misogyny is acceptable.

My letter to GLAAD

We in the transgender community are alarmed by the fact that GLAAD a organization dedicated to LGBTQ rights continues to sponsor and advertise RuPaul’s drag show. RuPaul is responsible for use of derogatory transphobic language such as “She-male” and “Tranny” repeatedly within multiple episodes of his program. Further he has repeated refused to apologize for the use of these words, and criticized those who are critical of this sort of language including GLAAD. Your mission statement clearly states that one of the major goals of GLAAD is, “holding the media accountable for the words and images they present.” I feel that we likewise should be holding our community responsible for the language and environment we create. I feel that we as a community need to hold individuals like RuPaul responsible for their use of this hateful language, and the repeated use of this sort of language needs to come with consequences. These slurs should be never okay to use, not now, not ever.

These words are hate speech that have often directed at those within my community and which has been directed at me personally as a transgender woman. These slurs do not belong to the drag community and they have no business using them under any circumstance or claiming the right to reclaim them. RuPaul usage of these words isn’t funny, isn’t a form reclaiming, it is transmysonogy at its worst. These terms are hateful terms that has been directed at our community for years and the encouragement to those who are not transgender that it is okay to use these terms and associate them with transgender women, and that it is okay to perpetuate transphobic thought and language is something we in the transgender community feel is unacceptable.

I know multiple trans people facing suicide, mental health issues, homelessness, job-loss, workplace harassment, healthcare discrimination, and even assault. My community are often subjected to these terms which should not be deemed appropriate and told that we have no right to have a voice or speak out. Many have commit sucide due to feeling hurt and like they have no means of support. I struggle every day due to the internal (and in some cases external as well) transphobia I see others possess (and I live in California), I am judged and often feel like I am treated like a second class human being. Those of us who are transgender are just as much a part of this community as anyone else, and deserve the respect, rights, voice, and love that would be granted to any individual of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Queer identified individual. It shocks me that as part of this community we are so often denied these basic needs by our very own cisgender siblings within the community.

I urge you to please reconsider sponsoring a television program that promotes the perpetuation of this type of transphobia,
Nami Raven Hatfield

lypsinc14:

A few weeks ago, I was a part of a trans panel held by the NFTY SoCal Social Justice Kallah in Santa Barbara. We all shared our experiences with highschool students, having a healthy conversation about current transgender policy work, controversy, media’s portrayal of trans people, religious beliefs, and our personal lives. It was an eye opening experience. I never thought in a million years that I would be sharing something I was once bullied for and ashamed of in high school, with other high school youth. I learned that my voice and story is valid. I also learned that it is important to not only take ownership of your identity, but to also take ownership of your story. Thank you to the beautiful high school youth that allowed me to share my life. It’s a learning experience for all of us. :)

Xoxo,
KM

On visibility, activism and protest

While I agree visibility is so very important not all people feel comfortable or safe going to the street. Peoples lives can be at stake, and many in our community are fighting for their very lives and can’t afford to take the time to stage a protest. Sometimes it takes a lot just for people to have the courage to complain vocally and we most not forget that although they can’t be out doing activism or protesting that they are just as a important part and voice within our community and often are the part that needs our support the most. Protest is important for those who have the privilege to do so, but we most never forget that we are fighting for the entire community including those who are unable to stand with us.